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Greetings Goddess-lovers,

Did the Easter Bunny show up at your place today?

Two of our grandsons were here for the weekend, and along with our beagle/basset hound named Winston, they managed to find 32 eggs that were a good sign he had dropped by. (Winnie was off to a good start, but got distracted by a squirrel and finished third.)

Do you BELIEVE in the Easter Bunny? "A rabbit", you say, "that lays bird eggs in the colors of the rainbow, and is male? What's not to believe??"

It's a goddess thing!

Many of our Easter traditions arise from the ancient myths of the Saxon goddess known as Oestre or Eastre. She is a goddess of the dawn and the spring. Her name literally means the goddess of the shining light that rises in the east, aka, the goddess of the dawn. In Germany she was called Ostara.

Read the fascinating myths here and the peculiar nature of the Easter Bunny will make perfect sense. Honestly, it will.

Ostara and the Easter Bunny
(Rated R. Restricted, Must have Parent's permission if you're under 18)


The Dragonfly in Mythology

Did you notice the new letterhead for the Goddess Gift newsletter and the dragonfly perched in the header?

I originally planned to put a butterfly there . . . after all, butterflies are goddess symbols of transformation, a perfect logo for our site since we specialize in the role of goddess archetypes as a tool in personal transformation (the goddess personality types, as featured in the Goddess Quiz).


Somehow it kept coming out to be a dragonfly instead. (Sometimes art has a mind of its own.)

But . . .  the dragonfly is the symbol of resurrection. So it too is a suitable logo for the Goddess Quiz since the quiz helps you 'rebirth' the personality that you began life with--you know the one that somehow got lost along the way with all the family and social pressures to be someone 'more acceptable'.

 So I honored the call of the spirit, and let it be what it wanted to be. . . a dragonfly.


Most of us easily associate resurrection with the story of Jesus, but the resurrections of gods and goddesses in ancient times really wasn't all that unusual. Gods like Mithras and Baldur came back to life.

The goddess Isis resurrected her beloved Osiris in one of the most beautiful love stories ever told.  The goddess Inanna (and her earlier counterpart Ishtar) returned to life much wiser.

And the Greek goddess Persephone comes back from the Underworld  in an eternal cycle of death and rebirth to bring us apring each year.

My personal favorite of the resurrection stories (features lots of dragonflies) is found in the myths of the rainbow goddess Ix-Chel. Her grandfather seriously disapproved of her romantic obsession with the sun god  -- and rightfully so, because the god was a real jerk. But Ix-Chel's  'stalking' of the reluctant god was not only embarrassing to the family, but causing massive flooding in the land. It had to stop.

So her grandfather tried to stop her with a lightning bolt. Needless to say she died.  She lay dead for 183 days, with hundreds of fluttering dragonflies fluttering around her body in an attempt to revive her.

She came back to life and quickly realized the Sun God was not going to change. So she left him for good. Waiting until he fell asleep, she crept out into the night, taking the form of a jaguar so she would be invisible whenever he came searching for her in the night.

She eventually settled on a small island where she specialized in the protection and healing of women, especially those in childbirth. Today we know that island as the Isles de Mujeres (Island of the Mothers).

You can read her beautiful myths at The Rainbow Goddess Ix-Chel.


Easter eggs, the Easter Bunny, resurrection and the celebration of spring all remind us of the cycle of rebirth and the need for renewal in our lives. How gracefully interwoven are the pagan and Christian traditions In the history of Easter.

In closing,
   a reminder to..

Celebrate and find
all that brings good energy
and growth into your life.

Sharon